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Video footage has emerged showing that ISIS militants deployed a $500 consumer drone to spy on a crucial Syrian airfield, which they eventually seized. Taken by a DJI Phantom FC40 drone, the video was spotted on YouTube (and pulled, since it also contained graphic scenes of execution). It shows images of the base from what looks like a lofty altitude, along with insurgents discussing how to use the info. They later sent in suicide bombers to attack the important northern airfield, but it's unclear if the information from the drone was of much strategic use. However, the footage has further value for the group as propaganda. It formed part of a disturbing video meant to show that the group is high-tech (and extremely violent) which helps it attract and radicalize new recruits.

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Google Authorship is no more. It has lived for only three short years, from the time Mountain View launched it in 2011, displaying people's faces alongside anything they've written on a website tied to their Google+ accounts. Yes, it stopped showing author's profile pics back in June, because the company wanted to unify mobile and desktop experiences, and Authorship snippets take too much space on a phone's screen. But now it's officially dead, dead, dead, with Google Webmaster Trends Analyst John Mueller issuing its death certificate. See, people haven't been using it enough, and when they do, they almost always miss a step in the set-up process, like forgetting to link back to the publishing site on their Google+ profiles.

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Binging on Mad Men via Netflix or Blu-ray has a few advantages over watching the show when it broadcasts. Namely, not having to sit through commercials that jump higher in volume than anything heard in the halls of Sterling Cooper Draper Pryce. As spotted by The Hill, the FCC is hoping to change that last bit with an update to 2011's Commercial Advertisement Litigation Mitigation (CALM) Act; the outfit recently ruled for further volume-fluctuation restrictions for certain TV ads. Starting June 4th next year, an improved loudness measurement algorithm will be implemented that should make watching TV a bit more pleasant. How? It won't count the silent parts of an ad that can offset the commercial's average volume measurement, thus bringing the overall audio level down -- something that apparently hasn't been done before. We can't imagine that Harry Crane would be pleased by any of this.

[Image credit: Associated Press]

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On the B-side of LG's announcement that it will start selling two 4K OLED TVs, is the bad news for plasma. Korean papers Yonhap News and The Korea Times report home entertainment division lead Ha Hyun-hwoi's comments that the company will end production of plasma TVs soon. According to Ha, LG is conducting an internal study to decide when it will end plasma production -- not a bad run after rumors said it would shut down in 2008 and 2009 -- and will make an official announcement on the issue soon. LG is the last major brand making plasmas after Samsung announced its exit earlier this year, and Yonhap says that once LG shuts down, China's Changhong Electric Co. (the same company once on the receiving end of $1 billion worth of stolen plasma tech from LG) will be the only major manufacturer left in the game. If you don't love LCDs and you're not ready to drop $3,500 on a 55-inch OLED, it may be time to grab one of the few remaining plasmas and ride that out for the next few years.

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LCD Soundsystem's James Murphy has dabbled in some weird stuff since the group split up three years ago, so the news that he's now working with IBM to convert the back-and-forth cadence of tennis matches at the US Open into music... isn't really a surprise. What is surprising is what he and dev-collaborator Patrick Gunderson will ultimately wind up with: nearly 400 hours worth of algorithmically crafted "music" made from boiling serves, aces and faults into instrument tracks.

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Firefox typically fills a new tab with tiles of your most-visited websites, but if you're one of the brave souls using the Nightly experimental build, you'll see something else in there, too: ads. Mozilla has started rolling out sponsored tiles interspersed among websites you've visited on Nightly, months after the organization first announced its plans to do. When you first launch the browser, you'll get a pop-up notification that says some of the tiles will feature sponsored content, and that it'll clearly mark which ones are ads. But TheNextWeb, which has spotted this latest change on the browser's least stable build, noticed that some ads weren't marked at all.

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Today, we take a look at the LG G Watch R, catch Schrödinger's cat, learn about Apple's next iPhone event, uncover the science behind the traveling stones of Death Valley, and more! Read on for Engadget's news highlights from the last 24 hours.

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If you ever find yourself trying to remember just exactly what restaurant your friend recommended on Facebook several months ago, you might be able to do so soon with just a simple keyword search. Along with a "satire" tag and stickers in comments, it appears the social network is testing a feature that'll let you do a keyword search on old posts from people in your network. To be clear, the search will only be on posts that are meant for you to see. In other words, posts that your friends published as private will still be banned from your curious eyes if you're not the intended audience. Additionally, this test is apparently mobile-only. A Facebook spokesperson gave us this statement: "We're testing an improvement to search on mobile. In this test you can use keywords to search for posts you're in the audience for on Facebook." It seems the test has rolled out to a limited few for now, though seeing as it seems a bit of a no-brainer for us, we won't be surprised if this is rolled out officially some time soon.

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Amazon is selling a phone and reportedly even getting into the online ad business, so of course Google is ready to compete with its still-in-testing Prime Air drone delivery service. The Atlantic has a report on what is being called "Project Wing," a part of the Google X labs that have worked on Project Loon, Glass, driverless cars and so much more. As shown above, the idea is for a tail sitter unmanned aircraft (shown above, described as a hybrid between a plane and a helicopter that takes off and lands vertically), where the drone flies in like a plane, then hovers and lowers a package to the ground by wire before releasing it. The "egg" at the end of the wire hits the ground and drops the package before being pulled back up into the drone. So can you expect to receive a Google Shopping Express order this way anytime soon? Probably not right away, as the test shown took place in Australia, and there's plenty of testing and regulatory hurdles to get over before anyone is dropping off packages this way. If you're an interested partner (hey Netflix, maybe drones aren't a joke?) there's a sign-up sheet available.

Update: Check after the break for a video of the project.

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Well, that happened a bit sooner than we expected. The Xbox One update detailed earlier this month is rolling out to everyone over the next few days, according to Xbox Live's Larry "Major Nelson" Hyrb. The patch brings a revamped party app and multiple simultaneous deletes from the Game DVR in addition to the new GIF-capable (but not MKV-ready as of yet) media player app and bandwidth usage monitor. The latter of which will be very handy to those living with data caps and the multiple-gigabyte updates that have become de rigueur with this generation of gaming. There are a few more bits and bobs packed into the 258MB update, and if you're feeling impatient you should be able to force the patch this very instant.

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