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Yesterday, Community Health Systems announced that Chinese hackers had managed to steal the healthcare records of 4.5 million of its customers. Now, security firm TrustedSec is claiming that the reason the information was swiped was because of the world-famous Heartbleed vulnerability. TrustedSec founder David Kennedy then told Bloomberg that he learned this fact from three unnamed insiders who told him under the cloak of anonymity. The security expert went on to say that the attack took place roughly a week after Heartbleed was made public, but before the healthcare chain could patch the hole in its system. We don't think we need to tell you what the lesson is, here.

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Imagine a shirt or pants that can detect movement and tell you if that golf swing was weak or that jump shot was a bit lacking. That's the biggest goal of a company called mCube: to have its new and really tiny accelerometer embedded in clothing, though it could obviously be used for sports bands and other devices, as well. At just one millimeter across, the new motion detector measures but less than half of traditional ones. More importantly, it combines the accelerometer component that detects movement and the other that processes signals and data gathered by the first one, which are typically separate. This allows the chip to be power efficient, cheaper and -- according to mCube, at least -- more accurate than alternatives. mCube even believes that the device is effective enough to provide motion detection for super cheap phones without gyroscopes. While the company hasn't announced which devices will carry the product, we'll likely come across one of 'em soon enough, as mCube has already shipped 70 million units to China.

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It turns out Electronic Arts' Access program has at least one high-profile spectator: Ubisoft CEO Yves Guillemot. The Assassin's Creed and Watch Dogs company's head says that Ubisoft is keeping a keen eye on what that type of service can offer players, telling Game Informer that he's open to "any way" of giving fans access to Ubisoft's games. However, "it has to work well and be a smooth experience," he says. An Access-like system seems like the natural progression that the French company's been building toward for awhile, albeit slowly, putting various pieces in place and testing them out over time. Given Ubisoft's checkered history with DRM issues and that Uplay Passport system, though, it's probably better if Guillemot lets someone else deal with the growing pains with this time 'round.

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Secret on an iPhone

Secret's app is ostensibly meant for office gossip and getting transgressions out of your system, but it has also been abused by bullies wanting to intimidate and shame others. Well, one Brazilian judge is fed up with that misuse -- enough so that he's ordering Apple and Google to remove Secret not just from their respective local app stores, but from people's devices. Microsoft also has to yank Cryptic, an equivalent Windows Phone app. If the companies don't take action within 10 days, they face fines of 20,000 Reals ($8,876) per day. That's a drop in the bucket given their massive revenue streams, but it's reasonable to say that they'd rather not pay that much just to keep one title available in one country.

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Not sure how to make an animated GIF? Don't worry, you don't have to learn a darn thing -- an unofficial web tool will do it for you. The website, simply named GIFYouTube, does exactly what it sounds like: it converts your favorite streaming video into an animated image. It's ridiculously easy to use (simply adding "GIF" to the front of any video URL kicks off the process), but it isn't perfect: GIFs only output in the above size for now, and the user controls are limited to selecting the animation's start time and duration. We also found that it only worked consistently in Chrome. That said, it's a neat tool, and its creators plan to add Webm and caption support in the near future. Want to check it out? Well, click right here.

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Been taking advantage of the Xbox 360's "Games with Gold" deal? You might be running out of hard drive space, and Microsoft knows it: it just updated the Xbox website with a teaser for a 500GB hard drive. At $110 it's still more expensive than PC storage, but it's oddly cheaper than the 320GB Xbox 360 HDD that's currently on the market. It's not clear if the new drive will serve as a replacement or if the price is merely a placeholder, but we'll never scoff at more storage space. Unfortunately, you can't order the new drive just yet -- the product page just says that pre-orders are "coming soon."

[Image credit: yum9me, Flickr]

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While we've seen some pretty big advancements (and even bigger installations) in solar-energy collection lately, unless you're looking for privacy, one of the biggest light-catchers -- windows -- have to go largely under-utilized. Researchers at Michigan State University might have a solution for that, though. The Spartan scientists have developed a transparent, colorless method for collecting the sun's rays and converting them to electricity, claiming that the tech's applications could be used pretty much wherever clear materials are needed. The system relies on a coating of organic molecules that soak up ultraviolet and near-infrared rays. From there, the rays are pushed to photovoltaic solar cells at the edge of the surface where they're converted into electricity.

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Car battery

It's great that manufacturers recover lead from discarded car batteries to use in new ones, since lead production from ores yields toxic residues. The problem is, when we shift from lead-acid to lithium-ion and other types of batteries (and we're starting to), over 200 million old batteries could be retired in the US and cause serious environmental issues. Thankfully, a team of MIT researchers has discovered one way to recycle lead from car batteries, and the end product is something very, very useful: long-lasting solar cells. We're talking about a new breed of solar cells in particular, one that uses a compound called perovskite, which needs lead to be manufactured.

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While the rest of us were out frolicking in the sun, The New York Times' Upshot blog spent the early part of the summer sussing out which counties in the United States were the easiest and hardest to live in. After a little extra prompting from Google's chief economist, editor David Leonhardt and the Upshot team used Google Correlate to dig into what these groups on either side of the digital divide were searching for online. Some terms -- the like "Oprah" and "Super Bowl" - are searched for by just about everyone. As you might've guessed, though, those search terms ultimately diverge... pretty wildly.

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It's a pretty common thing to see in an online store: pay with PayPal -- but what about on mobile devices? Well, the eBay-owned company is working on that. The company just announced PayPal One Touch, a new system that (as the name implies) hopes to make paying of items in mobile apps a one-touch affair. The feature isn't an app itself, but rather a service that can be embedded in other apps. Users will log into their PayPal account one time, and subsequently be able to pay for products in supported apps with a single click.

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